Linuxdoc Linux Questions
Click here to ask our community of linux experts!
Custom Search

Chapter 16. Building bridges, and pseudo-bridges with Proxy ARP

Bridges are devices which can be installed in a network without any reconfiguration. A network switch is basically a many-port bridge. A bridge is often a 2-port switch. Linux does however support multiple interfaces in a bridge, making it a true switch.

Bridges are often deployed when confronted with a broken network that needs to be fixed without any alterations. Because the bridge is a layer-2 device, one layer below IP, routers and servers are not aware of its existence. This means that you can transparently block or modify certain packets, or do shaping.

Another good thing is that a bridge can often be replaced by a cross cable or a hub, should it break down.

The bad news is that a bridge can cause great confusion unless it is very well documented. It does not appear in traceroutes, but somehow packets disappear or get changed from point A to point B ('this network is HAUNTED!'). You should also wonder if an organization that 'does not want to change anything' is doing the right thing.

The Linux 2.4/2.5 bridge is documented on this page.