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11.14. Prompt Beeps After Long-Running Commands

Robb Matzke (matzke at llnl dot gov) sent me this a long time ago (sorry Robb, should have put it in sooner!). This prompt uses Perl and the builtin times command to determine if the program that just finished running has used more than a certain amount of time. The assumption is that you might have changed desktops by then and notification would be nice, so it rings a bell. I've tried to avoid using Perl because the overhead is fairly high, but this is a good use for it.

I haven't tested this prompt myself. I like the idea though. Robb includes instructions in the comments.

#!/usr/bin/perl
require 5.003;
use strict;

###############################################################################
# prompt_bell -- execute arbitrary commands contingent upon CPU time
#
# Copyright (C) 2000 Robb Matzke
#
#    This program is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
#    under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by the
#    Free Software Foundation; either version 2 of the License, or (at your
#    option) any later version.
#
#    This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but
#    WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
#    MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE.  See the GNU General
#    Public License for more details.
#
#    You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along
#    with this program; see the file COPYING.  If not, write to the Free
#    Software Foundation, Inc., 59 Temple Place - Suite 330, Boston, MA
#    02111-1307, USA.
#
# Purpose:
#
#    This program is intended to be called each time a shell prompt is
#    displayed. It looks at current CPU times (user+system) for the shell and
#    its children, and if the CPU time is more than some user-specified amount
#    then user-specified commands are executed.  The author uses it to provide
#    an audio indication of when a long-running command completes.
#
# Usage:
#
#    The prompt_bell command takes two arguments: the name of a file
#    containing the latest CPU usage information for the shell and its
#    children, and some optional state information from the environment
#    variable $PROMPT_BELL_STATE.
#
#    The times file simply contains one or more times, zero or more to a line,
#    each of the form `#h#m#.#s' where `#' is a sequence of one or more
#    decimal digits and `#h' is the optional number of hours, `#m' is the
#    required number of minutes, and `#.#s' is the number of seconds and
#    fractions thereof. The total time is the sum of all the times in this
#    file. Example:
#
#        0m0.050s 0m0.060s
#        0m15.790s 0m0.220s
#
#    The output from this command is one or more semicolon-separated shell
#    commands which should be eval'd by the caller. If the difference between
#    the current CPU times and the previous CPU times (stored in environment
#    variable PROMPT_BELL_STATE) is more than $PROMPT_BELL_TIME seconds
#    (default 10) then the commands printed include the value of environment
#    variable PROMPT_BELL_CMD (default is "echo -ne '\a'").
#
#    Typical usage is:
#        eval "`prompt_bell $TIMES_FILE $PROMPT_BELL_STATE`"
#
#    and this command is usually part of the bash PROMPT_COMMAND. The author's
#    .bashrc contains the following:
#
#        PROMPT_BELL_TIME=15
#        PROMPT_BELL_CMD="echo -e 'done.\a'"
#
#        COMMAND_PROMPT='TIMES_FILE=/tmp/times.$$;
#                        times >$TIMES_FILE;
#                        eval "`prompt_bell $TIMES_FILE $PROMPT_BELL_STATE`";
#                        /bin/rm -f $TIMES_FILE'
#        export PROMPT_BELL_TIME PROMPT_BELL_CMD COMMAND_PROMPT
#
#    Note: the output of `times' is stored in a temporary file to prevent it
#    from being executed in a subshell whose CPU times are always nearly zero.
#
##############################################################################

# Convert #h#m#s to seconds.
sub seconds {
  my($hms) = @_;
  my($h,$m,$s) = $hms =~ /^(?:(\d+)h)?(\d+)m(\d+\.\d+)s/;
  return $h*3600 + $m*60 + $s;
}

# Obtain processor times in seconds
my $times_file = shift;
my $ptime_cur = 0;
open TIMES_FILE, $times_file or die "prompt_bell: $times_file: $!\n";
while (<TIMES_FILE>) {
  s/(?:(\d+)h)?(\d+)m(\d+(?:\.\d+)?)s/$ptime_cur+=$1*3600+$2*60+$3/eg;
}
close TIMES_FILE;


# Obtain previous state to compute deltas.
my $ptime_prev = shift;

# If the processor time was more than $PROMPT_BELL_TIME or 10 seconds
# then beep.
my $beep;
my $limit = exists $ENV{PROMPT_BELL_TIME}?$ENV{PROMPT_BELL_TIME}:10;
if ($ptime_cur-$ptime_prev>$limit) {
  $beep = ";" . ($ENV{PROMPT_BELL_CMD} || "echo -ne '\\a'");
}

# Generate the shell commands
print "PROMPT_BELL_STATE=$ptime_cur$beep\n";
exit 0;