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11.9. Extending a logical volume

To extend a logical volume you simply tell the lvextend command how much you want to increase the size. You can specify how much to grow the volume, or how large you want it to grow to:


# lvextend -L12G /dev/myvg/homevol
lvextend -- extending logical volume "/dev/myvg/homevol" to 12 GB
lvextend -- doing automatic backup of volume group "myvg"
lvextend -- logical volume "/dev/myvg/homevol" successfully extended
        
will extend /dev/myvg/homevol to 12 Gigabytes.


# lvextend -L+1G /dev/myvg/homevol
lvextend -- extending logical volume "/dev/myvg/homevol" to 13 GB
lvextend -- doing automatic backup of volume group "myvg"
lvextend -- logical volume "/dev/myvg/homevol" successfully extended
        
will add another gigabyte to /dev/myvg/homevol.

After you have extended the logical volume it is necessary to increase the file system size to match. how you do this depends on the file system you are using.

By default, most file system resizing tools will increase the size of the file system to be the size of the underlying logical volume so you don't need to worry about specifying the same size for each of the two commands.

  1. ext2/ext3

    Unless you have patched your kernel with the ext2online patch it is necessary to unmount the file system before resizing it. (It seems that the online resizing patch is rather dangerous, so use at your own risk)

    
   # umount /dev/myvg/homevol/dev/myvg/homevol
       # resize2fs /dev/myvg/homevol
       # mount /dev/myvg/homevol /home
                
    

    If you don't have e2fsprogs 1.19 or later, you can download the ext2resize command from ext2resize.sourceforge.net and use that:

    
   # umount /dev/myvg/homevol/dev/myvg/homevol
       # ext2resize /dev/myvg/homevol
       # mount /dev/myvg/homevol /home
                
    

    For ext2 there is an easier way. LVM 1 ships with a utility called e2fsadm which does the lvextend and resize2fs for you (it can also do file system shrinking, see the next section).

    Warning LVM 2 Caveat
     

    There is currently no e2fsadm equivalent for LVM 2 and the e2fsadm that ships with LVM 1 does not work with LVM 2.

    so the single command
    
   # e2fsadm -L+1G /dev/myvg/homevol
                
    
    is equivalent to the two commands:
    
   # lvextend -L+1G /dev/myvg/homevol
       # resize2fs /dev/myvg/homevol
                
    
    Note Note
     

    You will still need to unmount the file system before running e2fsadm.

  2. reiserfs

    Reiserfs file systems can be resized when mounted or unmounted as you prefer:

    • Online:

      
   # resize_reiserfs -f /dev/myvg/homevol
                        
      
    • Offline:

      
   # umount /dev/myvg/homevol
         # resize_reiserfs /dev/myvg/homevol
         # mount -treiserfs /dev/myvg/homevol /home
                        
      
  3. xfs

    XFS file systems must be mounted to be resized and the mount-point is specified rather than the device name.

    
   # xfs_growfs /home
                
    
  4. jfs

    Just like XFS the JFS file system must be mounted to be resized and the mount-point is specified rather than the device name. You need at least Version 1.0.21 of the jfs-utils to do this.

    
# mount -o remount,resize /home
                
    
    Warning Known Kernel Bug
     

    Some kernel versions have problems with this syntax (2.6.0 is known to have this problem). In this case you have to explicitly specify the new size of the filesystem in blocks. This is extremely error prone as you must know the blocksize of your filesystem and calculate the new size based on those units.

    Example: If you were to resize a JFS file system to 4 gigabytes that has 4k blocks, you would write:

    
# mount -o remount,resize=1048576 /home