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5.3. Kernel installation

If you have made a native build on the box you wish to install, you can setup the new kernel as follows: within the kernel source tree linux/, as root execute:


[user@machine ~/dir]> cp vmlinux /boot/vmlinux-[kernelversion]
[user@machine ~/dir]> cp System.map /boot/System.map-[kernelversion]
[user@machine ~/dir]> cp .config /boot/config-[kernelversion]
                                
Though it is not mandatory, we suggest you to replace [kernelversion] by the version of the kernel you built, e.g.: vmlinux-2.4.18-pa44. This will help you dealing with multiple kernel versions on the same machine. The same applies to .config. It is not needed to have a working kernel, though it might be very helpful when configuring a new one. Now, do cd /boot, make sure that vmlinux is a symbolic link to another file, as in the following example:

[user@machine ~/dir]> ls -l vmlinux
lrwxrwxrwx  1 root   root   35 Jun 23 01:38 vmlinux -> vmlinux-2.4.18-64-SMP
                                
Make sure to remember the name of the kernel actually running on your box if ever the new one won't work properly. You are now able to ask PALO to boot on it if needed (see Chapter 3 for more information). Now do the following:

[user@machine ~/dir]> rm -f vmlinux
[user@machine ~/dir]> ln -s vmlinux-[kernelversion] vmlinux
[user@machine ~/dir]> sync
                                
If you want to boot from network you can forget all this, as you will need to set PALO as explained in the Section 3.3, and run make palo to create the bootable lifimage.

If you have made a cross-compiled build or built a kernel on a PA box which is not the one you wish to install, you have to find a way to put vmlinux, System.map and eventually .config in /boot/ as mentioned before. You can use the network (like ftp) or a CD to do so, or even direct copy to the hard disk drive.