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Re: [Re: Navigation, ...



Hello all,

talking about the future... Linux is going to grow, and along with it the
documentation.
So far, it is not very user-friendly. If you don't know the command or the
keyword, you're stuck. 

Is there any way we could start sorting the documentation by theme instead of
format? Themes could be anything from sys admin to files management, along
with applications, tools, user management, security, integration, or whatever
major area there are. It could also be sorted first by distribution so as to
require them to save their doc under that path...?
I think that sorting by format is useful, but hopefully in not too long all
will be compatible and it won't have that much importance anymore.

Sorting by theme could be done either by putting the docs in different folders
accordingly, or possibly by getting some kind of nomenclature, or any other
way of making it easier for an user to figure out what is available.
When browsing, I know I personally don't care what format it is as long as I
can see that there is a documentation. 
I also know that I like to read documentation in a specific area better than
according to the first letter of its name, as it is now.
I hope that in the future, there will be some kind of help system where we can
open the index, and from there find just about anything in a logical sequence,
not just according to the name chosen by the software developer. Kinda to
encourage "surfing" in the documentation... And who knows, maybe someday there
might even be a really good search tool?!?

Cheers,
Rebecca




Stein Gjoen <sgjoen@mail.nyx.net> wrote:
> 
> Guylhem Aznar wrote:
> ...
> > Would you have time to sum up the current agreed propositions, including
> > dir. tree?
> 
> I'll try:
> 
>             Proposal v1.0
> 
> 
> Tree structure (FHS compliant, ref http://www.pathname.com/fhs/ ):
> 
> /
>   usr/
>     share/
>        HOWTO/        - the HOWTOs in HTML format goes here
>          index.html  - Our cover page (*)
>          00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
>          (other relevant pages linked to from index.html above)
> 
>          text/       - same HOWTOS but as plain text
>            index.html  - Our index page (**)
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
>          PDF/        - same HOWTOS but as PDF
>            index.html  - Our index page
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
>          PostScript/
>            index.html  - Our index page 
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
>          SGML/
>            index.html  - Our index page
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
>          HTML/
>            index.html  - Our index page
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
>        GUIDES/       - the Guides in HTML format
>            index.html  - Our index page
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
>          text/
>            index.html  - Our index page
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
>          PDF/
>            index.html  - Our index page
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
>          PostScript/
>            index.html  - Our index page
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
>          SGML/
>            index.html  - Our index page
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
>          HTML/
>            index.html  - Our index page
>            00-index    - a contents list for file and FTP browsers
> 
> Likewise for other potential directories such as RFCs, FAQs from
> Usenet News, other documents and standards.
> 
> 
> Contents:
> 
> The 00-index files describe the contents and follow the normal
> conventions on the net. Some FTP clients and file browsers can
> use these for (semi) intelligent navigation.
> 
> The index.html marked with (*) is based on the main page you see
> when you browse http://www.LinuxDoc.org/ with some minor exceptions:
>  - the links from that page point to files on disk using relative
> file:// URLs. Remember many do not have online access.
>  - added links that point to the corresponding area at www.LinuxDoc.org
>   in order to get the latest copy for those who are online.
> 
> Example: the link looks like "Guides [web]"
> where Guides points to file://guides.html
> and   [web]  points to http://www.linuxdoc.org/guides.html
> 
> A number of other HTML pages will be in the same directory
> such as manifesto.html, mirrors.html etc. The idea is to make
> the on disk files comprehensible.
> 
> The index.html NOT marked with (*) is based on the page you see
> at http://www.linuxdoc.org/sorted_howtos_quick.html
> and can in fact mostly be pointers to a single contents file
> which would be most natural to keep in the ./HTML sub directory.
> This web page would then need pointers to directories for any
> kind of format provided.
> 
> 
> Regards,
>    Stein Gjoen
> 
> 
> (PS: I am going on a 3 week holiday starting this weekend and I
> am unlikely to be reachable over the net during this period. The
> entry to LWN has been submitted and might make it for this weeks
> issue).
> 
> 
> --  
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